Diabetes can strike at any age.

DR. D-Childhood Diabetes

As shown in the graph from the Center for Disease Control below it is evident that childhood diabetes is on the rise in the United States.
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The most typical type to look for in children is type one. This is not to say that type two is not of concern, it just typically appears more in the late twenties to thirties. Let’s consider the risk factors and preventative measures of both types to make sure your child is covered:

Risk Factors of Type One Diabetes:

Family History: Anyone with a parent or siblings with type one diabetes has a slightly increased risk of developing the condition.

Genetic Susceptibility: The presence of certain genes indicates an increased risk of developing type one diabetes.

Race: In the United States, type one diabetes is more common among non-Hispanic white children than among other races.

Risk Factors of Type two Diabetes:

  • Not active
  • Overweight
  • Other family members with type two diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • African American
  • Hispanic American
  • American Indian
  • Asian American

Environmental Risk Factors of both types:

Certain Viruses: Exposure to various viruses may trigger the autoimmune destruction of the islet cells.

Diet: No specific dietary factor or nutrient in infancy has been shown to play a role in the development of diabetes. However, early intake of cow’s milk has been linked to an increased risk of type one diabetes, while breast-feeding might lower the risk. The timing of the introduction of cereal into a baby’s diet also may affect a child’s risk of type one diabetes.

Signs it is Time to take your Child to see a Healthcare Provider:

  • If your child feels sick, tired, sleepy and thirsty
  • Goes to the bathroom to urinate frequently; gets up at night to urinate
  • Has no energy to play, work or have fun
  • Has blurry vision

The diagnosis of diabetes can be overwhelming considering it requires consistent care, medication and monitoring, but with adapting a healthy lifestyle of exercise, diet and taking the proper medication the disease becomes far easier to manage. If your child has the risk factors but has not been diagnosed take preventative measures to ensure they stay in good health and diabetes free!

To schedule a consultation please call us at 614.299.9909 today!

 

#mdcare4you, #osudoc
Source: Mayoclinic.com, Center for Disease Control (photo)

 

 

Alcohol abuse: the not-so silent killer

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Research shows that more than 17 million people in the United States are dependent on alcohol.

Alcoholism, also known as alcohol dependence or alcohol use disorder, is the most severe form of alcohol abuse. It is a chronic disease that affects family and professional responsibilities, as well as the individual’s physical and mental health. People who are dependent on alcohol will more than likely continue to drink, despite facing family, health or legal obstacles because they need it to get through the day. Alcoholics also have a high tolerance and suffer from withdrawal, which includes sweating, insomnia, nausea, depression, headaches and irritability, to name a few.

No age is exempt from alcohol addiction, however, abuse is highest with adults ages 18 to 29 and lowest among adults ages 65 and older. Depending on the user’s tolerance, some common effects of drinking include risk of injuries, increase in violence, liver disease, developing some types of cancer, slower reaction times, problems with hearing and seeing and a lower tolerance of alcohol.

The difference between alcoholism and alcohol abuse is very small; however, if someone is abusing alcohol but not yet dependent on it, they may experience some tolerance and some withdrawal but nothing as severe as an alcoholic.

Abuse can be noticed when a person is seen with a pattern of drinking that results in repeated disruption of responsibilities to work, school or home responsibilities. Other warning signs include:

  • Drinking in situations that are physically dangerous, such as while operating a vehicle or combining alcohol with prescription medication
  • Having legal issues, such as being arrested for driving under the influence
  • Reaching for alcohol as a stress reliever
  • Continuing drinking despite having relationship problems that are caused or made worse by drunkenness.
  • No longer participating hobbies or activities that they were once involved in.
  • Lost control over drinking and can’t limit the amount they are drinking.

Since 1987, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc., has designated April as Alcohol Awareness Month. This month focuses on increasing public awareness, reducing stigma and encouraging local communities to address alcoholism and alcohol-related problems.

We can all do our part to prevent abuse. A few ideas you can utilize this month to raise awareness are:

  • If you suspect that someone is already an abuser, don’t ignore the problem. Help them seek treatment. Recovery will be an ongoing process, which will require new coping skills, treatment, time and patience. All problems that led to the abuse in the first place will have to be faced.
  • Share tips with parents to help them talk with their kids about alcohol usage. The earlier they talk to their children, the less likely they are to drink underage. Plus, the longer children wait to start drinking, the less likely they are to develop.
  • Talk with anyone you know who may be suffering from the disease. Challenge them to keep track of their drinking by setting limits.
  • Encourage alternative activities to teens/young adults that they can do in place of drinking.

If you think that you or someone you know is suffering from alcohol addiction, please call Dr. Schumacher, M.D., at (614) 299-9909 to set up an appointment.

 

Lost that Loving Feeling or Low Testosterone?

 

Low T may sound like the name of latest Hip Hop superstar but for men who suffer from Low T, or low testosterone, the condition is no laughing matter. Testosterone is a hormone that is mainly produced in the testicles although low levels of testosterone can also be found in women.  Though society generally equates testosterone with machismo and sex drive, this hormone is responsible for much more. In addition to helping men maintain their sex drive and sperm production, testosterone also regulates red blood cell production, bone density, and muscle mass. Testosterone production is at its prime during the teen years and in early adulthood then gradually decreases as men begin to age. Though this decrease is normal, the effects that Low T can have both mentally and physically can be confusing and at times, quite frustrating.

Common symptoms of low testosterone include difficulty sleeping, decreased sexual libido, hair loss, increased body fat, difficulty concentrating, and in some cases, depression. Many of these symptoms can be linked to other medical conditions such as clinical depression, alcohol use, and thyroid disorders however the most common reason that low testosterone occurs is the natural aging process.

If you think that you may be suffering from low testosterone, you are not alone. It is estimated that as many as 13 million Americans have low testosterone. The good news is that if your doctor has informed you that your testosterone is low, there are several hormone therapy treatments available to help you restore your testosterone levels. It should be noted that some of these hormone therapy treatments may have negative side effects such as breast tenderness, increased urination, and weight gain.

 In addition to hormone therapy treatments, there are also natural ways that you can help increase your testosterone such as making changes in your diet, decreasing stress level, and exercising. See your doctor to discuss your options and to help you decide which treatment, if any, is best for you.

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Still have questions? When it doubt, get checked out!

Call MD Care 4 You at (614) 299-9909 to schedule an appointment or go to our website: http://www.mdcare4you.com and register to use to our convenient, new patient portal system.

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Photo: Freedigitalphotos